Archive for October 2019

IDER: Emotional Education

October 23, 2019

IDER are Lily Somerville and Megan Markwick, two British women in their twenties who sing, write songs, and make some very fine sounds in the region of synth-pop. The pair met in Cornwall while at university and are now flatmates in London where they collaborate on songwriting and have just made their debut album Emotional Education.

This summer the new album from Shura was reviewed here and the IDER album was released around the same time. This is more than a loose connection as it was through Shura that IDER first came to our attention when she produced a song for them on a previous mini-album – there are also some musical similarities.

The eleven songs on the new album are full of rich melodies and a generally melancholic feel as the pair sing of the hopes, fears, and troubles of young people growing up in the 21st century. Far from this limiting the album’s appeal, the songs are ultimately cathartic, and the emotions surely universal.

Opening track ‘Mirror’ draws us in immediately with its fine tune and angsty mood while ‘You’ve Got Your Whole Life Ahead of You Baby’ is an irresistible earworm. It’s not all synths as there are hints of folk, roots, some unusual harmonies, and a live brass section on more than one song. The album’s title appears in the lyrics of the outstanding penultimate track ‘Saddest Generation’. It’s a fierce, honest, and ultimately wise song about mental health and more. It shows off best of all what they have achieved up to now.

IDER will soon be very busy touring live. Starting on 28th October they will play in Oslo, Norway, and then in Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Berlin. The tour continues in November throughout Europe ending on the 26th in Edinburgh, Scotland. Full details on their website.

Emotional Education is out now on Glassnote Records.

www.glassnotemusic.com

www.weareider.com

The Revelers: At the End of the River

October 8, 2019

To say that The Revelers are a Cajun band from Louisiana tells only part of the story. Their new album At the End of the River ~ Au bout de la rivière brings together a heady concoction of musical styles. In addition to the well-known Cajun sounds of their home territory they throw in some swamp pop, zydeco, and blues, and there’s also a sidestep into country music.

It might seem a bit all over the place at first but growing familiarity with the album has convinced this listener that the band knows exactly what it’s doing and at the very least the members are all excellent musicians. The songs are divided almost equally between English and French language vocals with six sung in French and five in English.

They come out firing on all cylinders with the opening track ‘Au bout de la rivière’ to create the perfect party mood. And just at the point when we think we know exactly where this song is going there is the unexpected addition of saxophone.

The blending of accordion, fiddle, and saxophone appears on many tracks and is used almost as a kind of substitute brass section. It makes you wish you could see the band perform live as their music is exhilarating and clearly very danceable. While accordionist and songwriter Blake Miller is at the forefront of much of what is best here, all six members contribute greatly in various ways.

It isn’t all played at a breakneck pace and one of the best tracks is ‘Bonsoir, petit monde’ a slower song with a French vocal and a superb blend of fiddle and saxophone. The two country songs are also surprisingly effective: ‘She’s a Woman’ and ‘You’re Not to Blame’ both feature prominent accordion and slide guitar and are written in a style not a million miles away from Willie Nelson.

The Revelers (Photo: Sandlin Gaither)

The moody, brooding and bluesy ‘I Wouldn’t Do That to You’ is another change of direction that works well. These sudden shifts in rhythm and style are not jarring at all and they provide a nice contrast on an album where there is a lot of upbeat music.

It’s easy to see why they are so popular in their home base of Lafayette where Cajun music has its heartland. In fact, the band are unofficial musical ambassadors for Lafayette where they run the annual Blackpot Festival involving the whole community in songs, music, dancing and food. This year’s festival will be held on the 25th and 26th October.

By their own admission, The Revelers are dedicated to the ‘holy trinity’ of Cajun culture: hot music, all-night dancing, and great food. With this album they have succeeded very well in making a new sound by synthesizing many different elements of music from Louisiana and beyond.

At the End of the River ~ Au bout de la rivière will be released by The Revelers on 8th November.

www.revelersband.com

Turning Japanese with Kina

October 4, 2019

This week a friend reminded me of something I’d written in the first edition of The Power of Okinawa book. I ended the chapter about Shoukichi Kina with the words: “Kina may still have some more surprises to give us.” I had forgotten that, but it obviously wasn’t a particularly perceptive thing to say as the great Okinawan singer’s middle name (if Okinawan people had middle names) would surely be ‘impulsive’.

Kina, of course, surprised many of us by going on to become a politician and was even a member of the short-lived government in Japan before eventually being expelled from Minshuto, the Democratic Party of Japan. He subsequently stood unsuccessfully as an independent candidate for Governor of Okinawa.

But the biggest surprise of all must surely be his recent return to the recording studio with the release of a new single, ‘Fujiyama Japan’. The surprise is not that he has paid so little attention to new music over the past few years. No, the clue is in the song’s title. For this is a song in praise of Japan. In fact, it’s something of a homage to the Japanese spirit. Yes, Japanese spirit, not Okinawan.

Shoukichi Kina (Photo: Stephen Mansfield)

This is little short of a seismic shock. It would be on a par with veteran octogenarian singer Misako Oshiro suddenly announcing she is heavily into gangsta rap and is going on tour with Ice Cube. (She isn’t).

In the music video for ‘Fujiyama Japan’ we follow our man Kina as he wanders the city streets before communing with nature while Mount Fuji looms in the distance. The co-written song extols the virtues of all things Japanese and has lyrics by Ryo Shoji and enka-style music by Kina. The only hint of Okinawa is the sanshin that Kina carries to let us know where he’s from and then plays briefly (though we can’t hear it). The video ends with lots of musicians playing violins. It’s awful, and awfully unoriginal too.

Never mind, I thought, maybe the B side is something very different. (Are there still B sides?) A sparkling new Kina original perhaps and too groundbreakingly radical to be the main song. Anyone who follows Kina must surely know, however, that he is not going to miss the chance to include the millionth recording (this time the so-called Reiwa era version) of ‘Hana’ and, yes indeed, here it is again. Oh no!

At the beginning of his recording career Kina released the single ‘Tokyo Sanbika’ (included on his first album). This was a song mocking the lifestyle of the busy, self-important Tokyo man. All his life Kina has oozed Okinawan spirit, fought against the injustices meted out to these islands by Japan, and once said: “I don’t just hope for independence, I think it’s absolutely right that these islands should be independent again. I want to make a model society in the Ryukyu Islands which has freedom and happiness and will be an example for the rest of the world.”

So, has Kina had a change of heart? Is he being ironic? Is there some underlying message that we’ve missed? Is it an attempt to ingratiate himself with Japan so he can sing at the Olympic opening ceremony next year? Or has he gone crazy? Well, I would have to ask him (if I dare) but it seems most likely he is just following those impulses again. If nothing more it’s a return to music.

Some people might like ‘Fujiyama Japan’, of course, and I’m sure it will go down well with Shinzo Abe if he ever gets to hear it. For now, we should perhaps be grateful that there is someone like Shoukichi Kina in Okinawa to continually surprise us, even if some of those surprises are occasionally unwelcome.

You can watch the ‘Fujiyama Japan’ music video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XznrEcIBYJ0&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3gMw4Q1eaKTrWTepWIUnBfPsU8CWpar-_rO4MNB2NiwiWcRcjVGlbuHEQ